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While going to court may resolve the outcome of a legal issue, it is often not the way to resolve family conflict.

While sometimes necessary and unavoidable, going to court often creates fear around possible outcomes and polarizes family members, particularly when a relationship with children will be affected. In the lead up to going to court, negative feelings and perceptions can escalate and children witness that animosity and fear. Rather than heading down that road, choose […]

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What’s the difference between a Prenuptial Agreement and a Cohabitation Agreement?

A Prenuptial Agreement is an agreement made before marriage usually to resolve issues of support and property division if the marriage ends in divorce or death. It can be entered into in contemplation of marriage but it is unenforceable until after the marriage. A Cohabitation Agreement is an agreement outlining the property and financial arrangements […]

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If one of our appliances is listed in the real estate purchase contract as being sold with our home, can we replace that appliance with a different one before closing?

The answer is no. There is an expectation that the buyer will receive the same appliance as was in the home when the offer was made, unless otherwise specified in the real estate purchase contract. The contract also provides that the appliance will be in good working order on the day of closing. If problems […]

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What is a Real Property Report (RPR) and why do I need one?

A Real Property Report, drawn by a qualified surveyor, shows the location of all buildings and improvements on your property. You need this to get a letter or stamp of compliance from the City. And you will need to provide both of these things to the buyer if you are planning on selling your property, […]

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How is calculating spousal support different than calculating child support?

Unlike the tables for child support, which are law pursuant to the Divorce Act, the Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines have never been enacted and are an informational tool only. The danger in relying on just these tables is that only some crucial considerations are addressed. The first question – what factors affect entitlement to support […]

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I have purchased a home and I will take possession next month. I drove by the house yesterday and I noticed that shingles have blown off the roof. Can I withhold money from the purchase price until the roof has been repaired?

Unless you have already negotiated a hold back in your Real Estate Contract, you cannot unilaterally withhold money from the cash required to complete the purchase. Immediately ask your lawyer to request a hold back with a specific time limit for the completion of the roof work. If the request for a hold back is […]

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Why would I pay a lawyer to assist me in drafting my Enduring Power of Attorney and Personal Directive?

There are many resources available to assist people in creating their own documents.  However, it is important to ensure that you are thorough and that all arrangements, including those in your will and those between partners or spouses, all work together. A lawyer is like any other expert, and he or she can offer some […]

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Do I need a travel consent letter to travel with my children?

If you plan to travel outside of Canada with your children and without the other parent, then we strongly recommend having the other parent sign a travel consent letter well in advance of your travel date. This recommendation applies whether you are divorced or married and anytime when your children are travelling with one one […]

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Divorced? Have you changed your will?

Recent changes to estate legislation in Alberta now cause a gift in a will to a former spouse to be revoked, unless a contrary intention can be shown. However, this new rule only applies to situations where the divorce was granted after the changes were proclaimed, which happened in February 2012. If you were divorced […]

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Ask an Expert: What happens to my online accounts upon my death?

The new Estate Administration Act requires an executor, also called a personal representative, to manage online accounts and to identify and manage digital assets. When creating an estate plan, care should be given to creating a list of all online accounts (like eBay or PayPal) and virtual property (communications like Gmail or MSN; media like […]

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